Q
Speed Bumps vs. Speed Humps
A
To ensure the safety of both drivers and pedestrians in your parking lot, garage, or other drive-through areas, controlling speed is essential. And while speed limit signs can be effective, solutions that force drivers to slow down — speed bumps and speed humps, also known as "traffic calming" devices — offer an increased level of safety.



So, what's the difference between speed bumps and speed humps, and how can you tell which option better fits your needs?

Speed bumps are abrupt raised areas, typically 2–3 inches high with a travel length of 12 inches, that can be comfortably crossed at speeds of 5 miles per hour or less. Crossing at higher speeds can cause significant discomfort for the vehicle's occupants. Because speed bumps require an immediate and dramatic slowdown, they are often considered to be a liability risk on public streets and other roads where higher speeds are allowed. If you need a speed-control solution for low-speed areas, such as parking lots, garages, and low-traffic private roads, speed bumps would be a good option.

Speed humps are designed to slow vehicles while maintaining traffic flow, with a gentler rise and a lower peak height. Their design allows drivers to cross comfortably without sudden braking, allowing traffic to flow smoothly while still controlling speed. Speed humps are ideal for entertainment venues that accommodate large volumes of traffic, and they are also recommended for residential streets with speed limits of 25 miles per hour or less. If you need a solution for higher-speed areas where smooth traffic flow is essential, consider opting for speed humps. Whether you choose speed bumps or speed humps, here are a few features to look for:

Choose a model made from recycled rubber, which conforms easily to the road.
Look for embedded reflectors to ensure visibility in low light or at nighttime.
End caps will help preserve your investment by protecting the ends of the speed bump or hump from wear.
Select devices that are easy to install and transport, should you ever need to relocate them.

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